United States v. Ross William Ulbricht

ERAD AdminCase Law Support

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Digital currency allegedly used by defendant and his co-conspirators constituted“funds”within meaning of money laundering statute. Digital currency at issue had value, in that it could be used to pay for things. (need full write-up)

Riley v. California

ERAD AdminCase Law Support

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There is simply no basis to extend Riley v. California 134 S. Ct. 2473, to digital information that literally has no purpose other than to be provided to others to be read. (need full write-up)

United States v. Appellee

ERAD AdminCase Law Support

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8th Circuit Court of Appeals confirms that reading a magnetic stripe card is not a 4th amendment violation and using a magstripe reader was similar to using ultraviolet light to check currency. (need full write-up)

United States v. Bah

ERAD AdminCase Law Support

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6th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling that a scan of magnetically-coded information on a credit or debit card does not involve a physical intrusion into a constitutionally protected area. (need full write-up)

United States v. Alabi

ERAD AdminCase Law Support

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The agents’ examination of the magnetic strips on the credit and debit cards did not constitute a search for Fourth Amendment purposes. (need full write-up)

It’s not a Fourth Amendment search if a cop swipes your credit card, court finds

ERAD AdminCase Law Support

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Mag stripe simply contains same info that’s clearly visible, so no warrant needed. CYRUS FARIVAR – 6/10/2016, 7:00 AM A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday that law enforcement can legally scan or swipe a seized credit card—in fact, it is not a Fourth Amendment search at all, so it doesn’t require a warrant. In the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals’ 15-page opinion, swiping … Read More